California Consumers Privacy Act got amended and enforcement actions delayed

After only three months from its approval the California Consumers Privacy Act (CCPA) was amended. On September 23, 2018 Senate Bill 1121 was signed into law. The legislation, which takes effect immediately, amends the CCPA, which was passed on June 2018. Among other things, the amendment: – clarifies the definition of “personal information”, explaining that it […]

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The California Consumers Privacy Act

On June 28, 2018, California passes Bill 375 (Chau, Hertzberg, Dodd), which will provide Californians with fundamental new consumer privacy rights. In summary, the broad private right of action in the initiative covers instances of data breach – violations are subject to enforcement by the Attorney General – the right to know all a consumer’s […]

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Washington State privacy act moves ahead

  On Friday, March 22, 2019,  the Washington State House of Representative’s Committee on Innovation, Technology and Economic Development held its first public hearing on the proposed privacy legislation, SB 5376. The Washington privacy act, SB 5376, was introduced January 17, 2019 and passed its third reading in the Senate with 46 votes (against 1) on […]

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Public employees’ communications about public business are subject to disclosure under the Cal. Public Records Act even if employees use personal account, Cal. SC. holds

On March 2, 2017, the California Supreme Court held that the electronic communications of a public employee about the conduct of public business may be subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act (“CPRA”) even if the employee used a personal account. The court considered how the law, originally designed to cover paper documents, […]

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A federal court’s discovery order contains interesting points on production regarding social media and material possibly covered by foreign privacy

In Melian Labs Inc. v. Triology LLC, case number 4:2013cv04791, a trademark infringement action, plaintiff objected to defendant’s non responsive responses to some of its requests for production. The order of the court (NDCA) is interesting (at least) under two perspectives. First, the order is interesting for the part in which it deals with the […]

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Francesca Giannoni-Crystal, “Something’s got to give” – Cloud Computing, as applied to lawyers – Comparative approach US and EU and practical proposals to overcome differences – My presentation at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna (Pisa, Italy) Symposium “Getting around the cloud(s) – Technical and legal issues on Cloud services” (November 30, 2013)

  In my talk I will go ahead analyzing the approach of American will provide some elements to understand benefits and risks of cloud computing from an American lawyer’s perspective. I ethics opinions on cloud computing. Then, I will discuss the different implications of privacy law on cloud computing under an American perspective, as opposed to a […]

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“Something’s got to give” – Cloud Computing, as applied to lawyers – Comparative approach US and EU and practical proposals to overcome differences – My presentation at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna (Pisa, Italy) Symposium “Getting around the cloud(s) – Technical and legal issues on Cloud services” (November 30, 2013)

  In my talk I will provide some elements to understand benefits and risks of cloud computing from an American lawyer’s perspective. I will go ahead analyzing the approach of American ethics opinions on cloud computing. Then, I will discuss the different implications of privacy law on cloud computing under an American perspective, as opposed to […]

In re Google Inc. Cookie Placement Consumer Privacy Litig., 988 F. Supp. 2d 434, 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 145727, 2013 WL 5582866 (D. Del. 2013)

On October 9, 2013, Delaware US District Court released a memorandum opinion dismissing charges against Google since plaintiffs did not demonstrate direct harm caused by the company’s actions. In this case, plaintiffs filed a consolidated amended complaint against Google and other companies providing internet services accusing them of having “tricked” their browsers into accepting unauthorized […]

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Making Sure BYOD Does Not Stand For “Breach Your Organization’s Data”

Originally published on South Carolina Lawyer (March 2016)   It is the modern employer’s dilemma:  do you allow employees to bring their personal smartphones, laptops and tablets to work for business purposes?  Do you purchase work devices for them, duplicating what they have?  Or do you simply ban use of any personal device for work […]

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